FOLLOW US | |

Call us on:
0800 8499110*

Email us: mail@liquidline.co.uk
* Liquidline may record or monitor calls for quality and training purposes.
Liquidline

Disclaimer: we’re confident that our commercial coffee machines make the best brew around, but we love drinking coffee at home too, so here we take a look at some of the more conventional ways of making your morning coffee in your own kitchen.

Added: 22nd August 2018


French Press


Using a French press, or a cafetière, is one of the most common ways of making coffee, and it’s not hard to see why. They come at a relatively low cost; though as with anything you can pay as much as you’d like to for this staple piece of kitchen equipment, with high-end models available at a cost. Still, a standard model usually does the job quite well, and they’re incredibly easy to get hold of from any homeware store or even supermarkets. They’re very straight-forward to use and, most importantly, they make a decent cup of coffee, which is really all we want in life. French presses come in various shapes and sizes from individual to eight cups or more, so larger models can be ideal when having friends round for coffee.




Coffee Machine


Whilst a home appliance is unlikely to live up to a commercial coffee machine, there are some pretty good models available for home use. The main advantage is that they’re quick and easy to use, so coffee’s ready when you need it; and there’ll be no leftovers or lukewarm coffee since you make each cup as you need it. There are a whole range of models to choose from, including bean to cup coffee machines, filter coffee machines and even models which will allow you to make barista-style speciality coffees in your own home.




Pour-Over Coffee Dripper


Simple but effective, this is a go-to method when you have limited time and/or energy for making a single cup of coffee. This is a cup-shaped device which sits on top of your coffee cup. You simply put a filter paper into the dripper, add the coffee and pour boiled water through so that it filters as it runs into your cup. It’s easy, it creates little mess/washing-up, and it’s perfect for making just one cup.




Aeropress


The aeropress captured the coffee news scene a couple of years ago. Although things have quietened down a little since, it remains a useful tool for making a single cup of coffee. The idea is that it’s somewhere between an espresso machine and a drip coffee maker, creating an airtight seal and using hand pressure to force water through the ground beans. It’s simple to do, and many claim it produces coffee with a superior taste.

How you to prefer to brew your coffee is down to personal preference, and may depend on whether you’re alone or offering coffee to a group, so try a few methods and see which works best for you.